Leawood Kansas Speeding Ticket Lawyer
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Have you been issued a Traffic Ticket?


Speeding tickets can be one of life's little problems. But what seems like a little problem at the time can have some pretty serious ramifications in the long run if not properly addressed. Driving an automobile in Kansas is a privilege not a right, and a person with many tickets can be in danger of loosing that privilege. Additionally, a tarnished driving record will increase your insurance premiums and could end up costing you a lucrative job. When speeding tickets are not addressed correctly many different things can happen including loosing your license or even being arrested and put in jail. When you have been issued a traffic ticket do the responsible thing and hire an experienced traffic ticket attorney to assist you.

Charged with No Insurance?


If you are found driving with no vehicle liability insurance (KSA 40-3104) you need the help of an experienced traffic attorney. You are facing a possible license suspension as well as some very hefty minimum fines. Remember driving with no insurance qualifies for the Kansas Habitual Violator act and a conviction could have some very serious ramification on your license.

Charged with Driving on Suspended?


If you have been charged with driving on a suspended license you need to understand that this is not a mere traffic citation, it's a criminal charge. You need the help of an experienced criminal defense attorney to navigate you through this process and protect your rights. A first-time conviction for a driving on suspended charge carries with it MANDATORY jail time. Don't wait until its to late, get a traffic attorney on your side today.

Commonly asked questions about Driving on Suspended License charges


Q: If I didn't know my license was suspended am I still in all this trouble?
A: If you are given a citation for driving on a suspended license, it does not matter if you knew of the suspension. Everyday people are pulled over and given DWS citations that didn't know of the suspension. License suspensions are given out for many different reasons. Click here to find out how to check your license status.

Q: Will I really go to jail if I am convicted of driving on suspended?
A: If you are convicted, per Kansas law the judge must sentence you to at least 5 days in jail.

Q: Can hiring an attorney help?
A: Hiring an criminal defense lawyer that has experience dealing with these types of cases is often the difference between going to jail and not going to jail. An experienced lawyer can find out why your license is suspended and fix the problem, then get your license reinstated and negotiate with the prosecutor to avoid a conviction and jail time.

Q: Will I have to go to court if I hire a lawyer to fight my DWS case?
A: In many cases, a lawyer can handle a suspended license case without the client ever having to go to court, depending on your particular cirumstance your lawyer can usually tell you at the outset of the case if you will have to go to court.

Q: How much money is it going to cost me to hire an attorney for my driving on suspended case?
A: Each case is different and presents different challenges to overcome before an attorney can get your license reinstated. We are upfront and honest about our fees. Most of the time we do DWS cases on a flat fee arrangement, I can usually give you a quote over the phone after a little research into your driving history.

Q: What are the different punishments for driving on a suspended license?
A:It varies widely from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and case to case. Some jurisdictions are more harsh on drivers, others are not as difficult to work with. An experienced criminal defense lawyer can give you insight into your particular circumstance.

Q: Will hiring a lawyer keep me out of jail?
A: You have an increased chance of staying out of jail if you are represented by an attorney. An attorney can work to get your license reinstated and negotiate an amendment or a diversion of the charge of Driving while suspended to a lesser charge, that doesn't have mandatory jail time.

Q: If my license is not able to be reinstated can an attorney still keep me out of jail?
A: You have an increased chance of staying out of jail if you are represented by an attorney. An attorney can work to negotiate an amendment to the charge of Driving while suspended to a lesser charge, that doesn't have mandatory jail time. If the prosecutor is unwilling to negotiate, an attorney can offer up mitigating circumstances to the judge and possibly get get the mandatory jail time suspended.

Q: What is a Habitual Violator?
A: A "Habitual Violator" as outlined in KSA 8-285 is a person licensed in Kansas that within the past five years, has been convicted of three or more of any combination of the following offenses.
1. DUI (Including those on Diversion)
2. Vehicular Homicide (KSA 21-3405)
3. Driving While Suspended (KSA 08-262)
4. Driving While Revoked
5. Violation of the 5th Clause of (KSA 8-142)
6. Any Felony if a vehicle was used in the crime
7. Failure to stop at the scene of an accident and perform duties required by (KSA 8-1602-1604)
8. Driving with No Vehicle Liability Insurance (KSA 40-3104)

Q: What happens if I become a Habitual Violator?
A: If you are deemed a habitual violator based on your record per KSA 8-285, your driving license will be revoked for three years. During that time you will not be able to drive.

Q: If my license is suspended can I get a Hardship License?
A: No, Kansas has no provisions for a Hardship license. Simply put they do not exist in Kansas.

Q: What kind of punishment can I get if convicted of driving on a suspended license?
A: A first time conviction for driving on a suspended license is a class B misdemeanor and is punishable by a mandatory jail sentence of 5 days, and up to 6 months in jail.

Q: What kind of Punishment can I get for a second or subsequent conviction?
A: A second or subsequent conviction is punishable by up to a year in jail and is a Class A misdemeanor.